Deliver Education and Be Transparent with Customers

In my Daily Dose video series, I explore the topics that chief customer officers must grapple with on a daily basis. Join me as I discuss what I’ve learned over the course of my 35-year career, so that you can more effectively do the work that needs to be done.

Today’s video is an excerpt from my online course, inspired by my book, Would You Do That To Your Mother? Click here to learn more about the course and enroll. 

The following is a lightly edited transcript of the video below.


Happy New Year! As we ease back into our regularly scheduled routines, I hope you’ve come back to work with a fresh and renewed attitude regarding customer-driven growth. I came across this great article by Katie Bloomgarden on Fortune, Corporate Responsibility is Taking on a New Meaning, and I thought it was relatable to today’s Daily Dose. The opening of her article really resonated with me—”doing the right thing in business is no longer synonymous with philanthropy. It now means investing in your people, future talent, environmental impact, and long-term business priorities.” She certainly hit the nail on the head with that point.

Bloomgarden’s article also addresses the fact that job training and transparency are increasingly becoming top concerns among consumers, and I agree. It’s something we should be concerned about both as consumers and as business leaders. How can transparency and guidance become our standard for how we sell and how we serve? Are you sharing all the facts, so customers always make informed and peace of mind decisions?

Don’t Keep Your Customers in the Dark

Here’s something we may have all experienced in our lives as customers. We contact the company for one thing and end up being sold much more than we bargained for, especially when it comes to our highest and our most complicated life expenditures, like taking care of our health, our vehicles, or keeping our families secure. We err on the side of accepting more. We accept more because we’re worried about what will happen if we don’t.

In these situations, we need a navigator, don’t we? We need peace of mind that our lack of understanding is not an opportunity for companies to sell more by appealing to our fear, our concern, and our desire to do the right thing for our families and for ourselves. We just don’t want to pay a gullibility tax where we overpay because of uncertainty and fear. Businesses need to share the facts so customers can decide.

We don't want to pay a gullibility tax where we overpay because of uncertainty and fear, so companies need to share the facts that empower customers to make informed decisions. Click To Tweet

Deliver Education and Complete Information

Make mom proud companies guide customers through the complexity of pricing and sell them only what they need. They earn the right to growth by navigating customers fearlessly toward the solutions they would lead their mother to, meaning only those right for the customer at that time. They deliver education, complete information, and plain and simple facts so that customers can decide what they really do need. With these actions, the make mom proud companies deliver that peace of mind. They give customers the full story, and they give them options. They make it the customer’s informed choice.

Overselling may work when our customers are vulnerable, but it won’t earn word of mouth or continued customer growth when they reflect on the experience and tell friends and share it on social media. Do you have any of those gullibility tax moments in your business? Why not clean house of them now and make mom proud?

Make mom proud companies guide customers through the complexity of pricing and sell them only what they need. Click To Tweet

How would your company act if every customer were your mom?

How do we cut through the rigmarole of business to give customers the treatment they desire, and employees the ability to deliver it?

In her latest book, customer experience expert Jeanne Bliss recommends making business personal to get the traction you need by focusing on one deceptively simple question: “Would you do that to your mother?”

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