April 21, 2015

Gain Clarity of Purpose to Steer Your Customer Decisions

What conditions must always be met before you say “yes”? IKEA designs the price tag first. They know that even people on a limited budget want a beautiful home, a comfortable place that feels like, well, home. Their purpose is to “create a better everyday life for many people.” IKEA wants to produce democratic design: products with flair at a price most people can afford.


February 3, 2015

Evaluate Your Current Customer Experience Bookends

Are you deliberate in the memories you deliver at the beginning and ending moments of customer contact? To plan reliable delivery, you must know the customer emotions involved in the experience from beginning to end. If you deliver great personalized service, but parking is a nightmare, you still have a hurdle to clear.


August 12, 2014

What are Your Customer Experience Bookends?

When you map out the customer experience stages, step away from ‘executing tasks’ and focus on the customer experience you want to deliver. To plan reliable delivery, you must know the customer emotions involved in the experience from beginning to end. If you deliver great personalized service, but parking is a nightmare, you still have a hurdle to clear.


October 31, 2013

Customers Remember Your “Hello” and “Goodbye”

First impressions last the longest. Is your purposeful? We know through social media that customers remember your “hello” and “goodbye.” With clarity of purpose, the beginning and ending moments of customer contact are guided by a unifying purpose.


April 16, 2013

What Pushes Your “Yes” Button?

What steers your decisions? IKEA designs the price tag first. Their purpose is to “create a better everyday life for many people.” IKEA wants to produce products with flair at a price most people can afford. They know that even people on a limited budget want a beautiful, comfortable home. Beginning with the price tag first keeps IKEA aligned with their purpose.


July 25, 2011

Hire in Haste. Repent in Leisure.

Creating a Customer Culture starts with hiring. You’ve got to know your higher purpose in customers’ lives. You’ve got to know what you stand for. And you’ve got to know what type of environment you are creating.

Leaders in beloved companies don’t worry about hiring a great employee and having him leave in three months. Instead they worry about hiring a bad employee and having him stay for three years.

If someone doesn’t align with the company’s core beliefs and values, it will be very difficult for that person not only to develop effective relationships, but to deliver your “special blend of magic,” the personality stamp of your culture.


December 20, 2010

If You Shed Legacy Industry Practices – What Could You Become?

Umpqua Bank is part Internet café, part community center, and part bank. The coffee’s good and it’s not a bad place to sit and read a book.” By shedding old industry practices and warming up and humanizing the experience of banking, Umpqua draws customers to them.


December 6, 2010

Guarantee the Customer Experience – Remove Price and Worry from Buying Decisions

How you are delivering peace of mind (in the form of a guarantee) to your customers? Most guarantees put the monkey on the customer’s back to manage a countdown clock on product happiness. Zane’s Cycles threw out the clock and decided to guarantee the happiness of the customer relationship.