The talent strategy side of customer experience

Talent strategy

If you’ve been listening to my podcast — I can’t believe we’ve done 41 episodes — one of the topics that comes up a lot is talent strategy. That is somewhat of a broad term, but here I take it to mean “getting the best people possible and retaining them.” Most CCOs will mention talent strategy when they talk to me, either on my podcast or in client work. We sometimes think that chatbots and automation are the “next big things” in customer experience, and maybe to some degree they are. One of the current / always-has-been big things, though, is having a good talent strategy. What does that look like? It’s going to vary by firm and size, but here are some ideas.

Talent strategy: Affording headcount

Headcount is often a rushed, messy process at organizations. Too often it goes to the manager who yelled the loudest about being busy, and not to the manager who really needs the help. We can fix this, however. Maybe an organization could do quarterly reviews of headcount needs, and each manager who wants headcount could present a five-minute presentation? The presentation could be about the role, its need for the business, and what the priorities of the role look like. CCOs are sometimes challenged in this aspect of talent strategy — people need to understand what CX is, and what the team is doing, before headcount can be expanded. (A lot of my podcast guests also discuss the first 9-12 months, and/or “quick wins.”) Headcount cannot be a rushed or political process, though. Especially in a time of shifting business models, you need to make sure talent is being afforded to the departments that will need it most.

Talent strategy: Recruiting/hiring

Entire books could be written about how to improve recruiting and hiring (and have been written). I will say this: just as you focus on experience reliability and innovation when facing customers, you need to do the same when facing employee candidates. Your employees are still your greatest advantage, so make sure the process is clear, priority-driven, respectful, communicative, and has them submitting projects and portfolios tied to what the job will be like.

Talent strategy: On-boarding

Make this a more transformative process, as opposed to a transactional one rooted in filling out forms. By the midpoint of Day 1, the employee should be taking on projects that will have legitimate customer-facing impact. That’s why you hired them, right? Because you trusted them to do just that? Let’s see what they can do. Enough with the weeks and weeks of meetings and “getting to know” people. (You do need to get to know stakeholders, yes, but the work should be the focus.)

Talent strategy: Promotion and retention

Great analogy between CX and sports in this recent Forbes article. When Tom Brady won his fifth Super Bowl a few weeks ago, did the Patriots say “Hey, now you should go be in the back office?” Of course not. Tom Brady is still good at being a QB. Unfortunately, in companies this logic dies out. If someone is great with customers, they become a back-office manager. While that might be good for them — higher compensation — it’s bad for the company because you just lost a customer All-Star. Maybe there’s a way to make the star a manager who also deals with customers? A hybrid role? There are any number of approaches. But don’t lose your best people because of a rigid commitment to “the ladder.”

Those are just four quick areas. I could go on and on about how to get the best people, which is why I linked up the podcast at the top. Check that out for more discussions around this topic.

Anything else you’d add on talent strategy?

FREE 5 COMPETENCY REALITY CHECK AUDIT

How far are you in embedding the 5 competencies?

This audit walks your organization through the five competencies to build your customer-driven growth engine; highlighting key actions, tactics and behaviors that should be occurring when they are embedded and functional in driving business operations and customer-driven growth.

You can use this audit in the beginning of your role to engage leaders and your operational silos and to educate them on the five competencies. Using this audit in a workshop setting is very powerful, and something we often do at the beginning of coaching. As you know, what comprises a customer experience transformation needs to be clarified and agreed to, so you can use this as both an audit and communication tool.

5 thoughts on “The talent strategy side of customer experience

  1. You’re right Jeanne!

    I think thet flexibility is key if you want people to stay and to grow in the company.

  2. Jade Beldham says:

    Great Post! In today’s ultra-competitive world, it’s the companies that manage customer relationships the best that are more likely to be successful than those that don’t. That’s why an implementation of modern CRM system like Salesforce or Microsoft Dynamics has skyrocketed in recent years. Contact our team of experts for any of your CRM needs http://www.acceinfo.com

  3. Good read! You are spot-on, the dilemma in having a customer/sales rock star is if he should or should not be promoted. Perhaps, you might think that your sales will suffer if he gets promoted. But, come to think of it, your rock star could take the lead position and could train/lead other MVPs of the field. There are pros and cons on this step – you have to analyze if the pros outweigh the cons. You said, “don’t lose your best people because of a rigid commitment to “the ladder” – make sure that they are happy no matter what job they are doing. As they’ve said “company is only as good as its talent.”

  4. Jeanne Bliss says:

    Brooke it’s true! This is not about the silos…but about delivering a great “one company” experience to the customer. The root cause in many ways is how people are compensated and how they view the work of the business!

    Thanks for staying connected Brooke!

  5. Jeanne Bliss says:

    Frederic,
    We must all be “Gumby” – right!!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *